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Performing Arts  

Discover reliable and peer reviewed sources in Music, Theatre, and related fields.
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Performing Arts

Welcome to the library's guide to resources in the Performing Arts!

For a simple search, explore Credo Reference under "Research Tools" to the left.

For a focused research in Music, Theatre, or related fields, click on a tab above.

 

      
     

    Featured Titles

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    Musicking Shakespeare: A Conflict of Theatres - Daniel Albright
    Call Number: ML80 .S5 A43 2007
    ISBN: 9781580462556
    Publication Date: 2007-08-01
    In this book, Daniel Albright, one of today's most intrepid and vividly communicative explorers of the border territory between literature and music, offers insights into how composers of genius can help us to understand Shakespeare. Musicking Shakespeare demonstrates how four composers -- Purcell, Berlioz, Verdi, and Britten -- respond to the distinctive features of Shakespeare's plays: their unwieldiness, their refusal to fit into interpretive boxes, their ranting quality, their arbitrary bursts of gorgeousness. The four composers break the normal forms of opera -- of music altogether -- in order to come to terms with the challenges that Shakespeare presents to the music dramatist.

    Musicking Shakespeare begins with an analysis of Shakespeare's play "The Tempest" as an imaginary Jacobean opera and as a real Restoration opera. It then discusses works that respond with wit and sophistication to Shakespeare's irony, obscurity, contortion, and heft: Berlioz's "Roméo et Juliette," Verdi's "Macbeth," Purcell's "The Fairy Queen," and Britten's "A Midsummer Night's Dream." These works are problematic in the ways that Shakespeare's plays are problematic. Shakespeare's favorite dramatic device is to juxtapose two kinds of theatres within a single play, such as the formal masque and the loose Elizabethan stage. The four composers studied here respond to this aspect of Shakespeare's art by going beyond the comfort zone of the operatic medium. The music dramas they devise call opera into question.

    Cover Art
    Shakespeare, Madness, and Music: Scoring Insanity in Cinematic Adaptations - Kendra Preston Leonard
    Call Number: ML80 .S5 L43 2009
    ISBN: 9780810869462
    Publication Date: 2009-07-09
    Shakespeare's three political tragedies "Hamlet," "Macbeth," and "King Lear" have numerously been presented or adapted on film. These three plays all involve the recurring trope of madness, which, as constructed by Shakespeare, provided a wider canvas on which to detail those materials that could not be otherwise expressed: sexual desire and expectation, political unrest, and, ultimately, truth, as excavated by characters so afflicted.
    Music has long been associated with madness, and was often used as an audible symptom of a victim's disassociation from their surroundings and societal rules, as well as their loss of self-control.

    In Shakespeare, Madness, and Music: Scoring Insanity in Cinematic Adaptations, Kendra Preston Leonard examines the use of music in "Hamlet," "Macbeth," and "King Lear." Whether discussing contemporary source materials, such as songs, verses, or rhymes specified by Shakespeare in his plays, or music composed specifically for a film and original to the director's or composer's interpretations, Leonard shows how the changing social and scholarly attitudes towards the plays, their characters, and the conditions that fall under the general catch-all of "madness" have led to a wide range of musical accompaniments, signifiers, and incarnations of the afflictions displayed by Shakespeare's characters.

    Focusing on the most widely distributed and viewed adaptations of these plays for the cinema, each chapter presents the musical treatment of individual Shakespearean characters afflicted with or feigning madness: Hamlet, Ophelia, Lady Macbeth, King Lear, and Edgar. The book offers analysis and interpretation of the music used to underscore, belie, or otherwise inform or invoke the characters' states of mind, providing a fascinating indication of culture and society, as well as the thoughts and ideas of individual directors, composers, and actors.

    A bibliography, index, and appendix listing Shakespeare's film adaptations help complete this fascinating volume.

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