This is the "Welcome!" page of the "American History" guide.
Alternate Page for Screenreader Users
Skip to Page Navigation
Skip to Page Content
Blount Library Home Averett University Home

American History  

Last Updated: Jun 5, 2017 URL: http://discover.averett.edu/american_history Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

Welcome! Print Page
  Search: 
 
 

Research Tools

Discover

Averett.WorldCat.org >>

Communicate

Research Paper
Presentation

Attribute

Easy Cite Tutorial

American History

Welcome to the library's guide to resources in American History!

For a simple search, explore "Research Tools" to the left.

For a focused research in American History or related fields, click on a tab above.

      
     

    Featured Titles

    Cover Art
    The Slave's Cause: A History of Abolition - Manisha Sinha
    Call Number: E 441 .S557 2016
    ISBN: 9780300181371
    Publication Date: 2016-02-23
    A groundbreaking history of abolition that recovers the largely forgotten role of African Americans in the long march toward emancipation from the American Revolution through the Civil War

    Received historical wisdom casts abolitionists as bourgeois, mostly white reformers burdened by racial paternalism and economic conservatism. Manisha Sinha overturns this image, broadening her scope beyond the antebellum period usually associated with abolitionism and recasting it as a radical social movement in which men and women, black and white, free and enslaved found common ground in causes ranging from feminism and utopian socialism to anti-imperialism and efforts to defend the rights of labor.

    Drawing on extensive archival research, including newly discovered letters and pamphlets, Sinha documents the influence of the Haitian Revolution and the centrality of slave resistance in shaping the ideology and tactics of abolition. This book is a comprehensive new history of the abolition movement in a transnational context. It illustrates how the abolitionist vision ultimately linked the slave's cause to the struggle to redefine American democracy and human rights across the globe.

    Cover Art
    Troubled Refuge: Struggling for Freedom in the Civil War - Chandra Manning
    Call Number: E 453 .M24 2016
    ISBN: 9780307271204
    Publication Date: 2016-08-16
    Even before shots were fired at Fort Sumter, slaves recognized that their bondage was at the root of the war they knew was coming, and they began running to the Union army. By the war's end, nearly half a million had taken refuge behind Union lines in improvised "contraband camps." These were crowded and dangerous places, with conditions approaching those of a humanitarian crisis. Yet families and individuals--some 12 to 15 percent of the Confederacy's slave population--took unimaginable risks to reach them, and they became the first places where many Northerners would come to know former slaves en masse, with reverberating consequences for emancipation, its progress, and the Reconstruction that followed.

    Drawing on records of the Union and Confederate armies, the letters and diaries of soldiers, transcribed testimonies of former slaves, and more, Chandra Manning allows us to accompany the black men, women, and children who sought out the Union army in hopes of achieving autonomy for themselves and their communities. Ranging from the stories of individuals to those of armies on the move to debates in the halls of Congress, Troubled Refuge probes the particular and deeply significant reality of the contraband camps: what they were really like and how former slaves and Union soldiers warily united there, forging a dramatically new but highly imperfect alliance between the government and African Americans. That alliance, which would outlast the war, helped destroy slavery and warded off the very acute and surprisingly tenacious danger of re-enslavement. It also raised, for the first time, humanitarian questions about refugees in wartime and legal questions about civil and military authority with which we still wrestle, as well as redefined American citizenship, to the benefit but also to the lasting cost of African Americans.

    Integrating a wealth of new findings, Manning casts in wholly original light what it was like to escape slavery, how emancipation happened, and how citizenship in the United States was transformed. This reshaping of hard structures of power would matter not only for slaves turned citizens, but for all Americans.

    Subject Guide

    Profile Image
    Jim Verdini
    Description

    Loading  Loading...

    Tip